Love in the Time of Corona — Fitness First

[Happy baby, Apollo-style]

Love in the Time of Corona — Fitness First

Everyone knows that the most successful fitness regimes aren’t relegated to the body alone, but to mind and spirit as well.  That’s why during these Days of Isolation in addition to working out every day, I’ve been aspiring to eat right, cutting down on my go-to fix which is sugar; get enough sleep — easy enough since I’ve shaved four hours off my daily commuting by quarantine-working from home; and feeding my soul a little every day with a good book, lovely music, and of course, the daily walk with the Apollo to beat the blues.

 

Speaking of, I think our pets are the big winners in the quarantine game since, between my husband and I, Apollo gets somewhere between four to six miles of walking in a day.

It helps that spring is here and we can partake of color therapy just by walking outside.  Even the rainy day walks have a dashing brilliance about them.

Food prep has risen to another level spurred on by the family-food-sharing chat group where we connect with our extended family members in a way that we never did before corona, texting a little info daily, exchanging tidbits on health and wellness, grousing about the current situation, global, political, and otherwise, but mostly just staying connected to assure that no one gets lost.

[Tikka Masala, Dahl and green beans by yours truly]

My husband’s been researching mushrooms, mostly because of this guy:

If you haven’t seen the movie Fantastic Fungi yet, I urge you to check it out.  Mushrooms could actually be the new wave in personal health for the 21st century.  Need something to support your immune system during Covid-19.  How about some turkey tail mushrooms?  Need some memory and nerve function support?  Try lion’s mane.  (My husband is growing some in our kitchen.)  There’s even a mushroom that eats plastic — pestalotiopsis microspora — and you can bet I’ll be looking into that a little more closely in the months to come.

So that leaves spirit.  There’s a lot to ponder in corona-villa and given our isolation status, more time to ponder over it.  Not so much for first-line workers, teachers who are trying to manage online classes, and parents with young kids who have found themselves playing both parent and teacher these frenetic days, but quite the opposite — but take heart.  The world will remember your contributions while your children will remember these days for decades to come.

For me, this time has shined a spotlight on the importance of family.  I never took my family for granted, but watching the impermanence of life play out daily across the globe makes me realize that it’s true — we only have the present — and despite every day looking a lot like the one that came before it, every day is still special.

You may find it hard to believe that, especially when all of our personal freedoms have shrunk to the size of walnuts, but if you, like me, believe that we have too many choices in our day-to-day lives, especially here in the U.S., then you may also believe that having so many choices can actually impede the quality of your day-to-day experience because you spend so much of it trying to decide:  between product a and b; between activity a and b; between entertainment a and b; and more.

[Raul and Bella and the constant choice of in or out?]

The choosing can be exhausting.  There’s a reason why a store like Trader Joe’s is thriving.  Their outlets are small compared to regular grocery stores because they’ve limited the consumer’s choices and rather than shy away, the consumer rewards them by voting with their dollars, running to TJ’s in droves, grateful not to have to think so much because the work has been done for them, the quality products are on the shelves, and isn’t that such a relief?  In fact, our bottomless pit of choices is one of the reasons many scientists think our planet now teeters on the brink of a sixth mass extinction although there are some who say that when that time comes it would be too late for intervention so go buy yourself a case of scotch instead.

Whether we’re going extinct or just really screwing things up for our descendants won’t be known until this time has passed, but we don’t need to all keep marching in lock-step on the road to extinction and then jump off the cliff en masse.  We can change the course.  Just look at the statistics.  In two short months, air quality has improved; traffic has lessened; and wildlife is returning; all great arguments for living more sustainably, revitalizing local economies, and making the world more resilient to future pandemics.

Before McDonald’s and Starbucks and Yankee Candle, to name a few, once upon a time, every community had a butcher, a baker, and a candlestick maker, small-town makers of goods and services that everyone needed.  Then NAFTA came along and free trade agreements ruled, and chains sprung up around the world, and America sent its production lines overseas to the cheapest bidder.  The upside is you can get your coffee or burger anywhere in the world; the downside is that you’ve just missed out on the local cuisine.

Think globally, act locally is a concept that has been around since the early 1900s.  The bigger upside to this approach is enormous, especially during times of crisis.  When the one maker across the globe of the tiny widget needed to complete the assembly on, say, an Apple iPhone goes offline, Apple doesn’t need to stop production because there will be more than one maker of that particular widget.  At least, that’s how it used to be before globalization went in search of a bottom line instead of a better life for everyone which, if you recall, is how the concept of globalization was sold to us.

I’m not saying we should ditch on globalization, just that we need to consider instead the triple bottom line (TBL) made up of the three P’s:  profit, people and planet.  Yeah, it’s cheaper to do business with a factory in China to assemble the new fall clothing line, but for years, China has had next to no environmental laws and if you asked the people who live along the Yangtze River who have contracted cancer from all the industrial dumping, I bet they’d prefer a regulation or two and maybe a water purification system.  If we want to trade globally, then our global trading partners should adhere to the same standards we do, be it for environmental, human, or civil rights.  Otherwise, vote with your feet and trade somewhere else.  Isn’t that a better way to live, giving everyone has access to a healthier, more affluent life, not just the developed countries with money?

Maybe, when this is all over, the coronavirus will be remembered as our watershed moment, the time we realized that we didn’t need all the choices and all the stuff that goes with those choices, rather, we just needed each other.

If you want an ah-ha moment, watch this beautiful little video.

And if you want to believe, watch this one by my friend, Jeff’s daughters — guaranteed to add light your day.

Stay well and healthy, friends.  Think good thoughts.  Send love to the planet and your neighbor.  “The universe has us surrounded,” says Swami Beyondananda, “so we might as well surrender.”  Why not work together to assure a collectively bright future?

Namasté y’all.  Stay safe.

pam lazos 5.2.20

About Pam Lazos

writer, blogger, environmentally hopeful
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56 Responses to Love in the Time of Corona — Fitness First

  1. cath says:

    Nice post, Pam, and yes, lovely video clips.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. hilarymb says:

    Hi Pam – thanks for this … lots to take in – but all so sensible … I do hope we can come to our senses and realise that we really don’t need all the glitz and glamour that last year offered us. The Tomfoolery video was a great one to see … as too your nieces – fun. I just hope people will be thinking things through and not just have angst about what’s happening – perhaps til it hits them. Take care – and Apollo is a lucky dog enjoying the great outdoors with you both – stay safe – Hilary

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Hello, Friend! I need to dig into that mushroom study, but I’ve always been a fan of mushrooms, as has Bo. Kids, though, think they’re gross, the party-poopers! I’m looking forward to your study of mushrooms eating plastic, and yes, I’d LOVE to see a return to the small town! We see the half-dead Wisconsin towns–heck, we live in one right now–and remember that once upon a time, every town could meet its basic needs. Wouldn’t it be a wonder if towns could start standing on their own again? sigh. Keep making every day the best it can be, and keep snapping those photos–they’re beautiful! A blessed Mother’s Day to you! xxxxxx

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Nadine says:

    I love that photo of you and Apollo stretching!!! Omg, so so so wonderful!!! 😍😄

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Great post. Wonderful opportunity to use this time to pause and as yourself continue to eat right and walk for the mind/body/spirit. I’ve had 2-3 light color sessions before. I swear by it My friend has one and we used to go to his house to lay under it for 20 min. Stay well 🧡🦋🌸

    Liked by 1 person

  6. TanGental says:

    There will be benefits and regressions I’m sure. Fitness might stay a thing for a lot of people and we will be more conscious of others even if for selfish reasons. I remain hopeful rather than cynical. We’ll see

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Quirky Girl says:

    What a coincidence- Jett’s favorite yoga move is also Child’s Pose, in the same style as Apollo! Apparently, a doggie can get a good stretch in that position, while still being readily available for a belly rub 😂

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Mick Canning says:

    I would love for this to be a watershed moment, but I fear there will be a huge amount of pressure to go back to the bad old ways as soon as possible (there already is, of course) from all the usual vested interests. But I’m sure there will be lots of pressure for change, too. Who knows which will win out?

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Susan Scott says:

    Lovely post Pam, text and photos … definitely this time is cause for pause. We’ll be re-evaluating everything for a lonnng time…. have a great week xx 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  10. All that you’ve said here Pam is so very true. I hope everyone can come out of this time with a new renewed sense of respect for the planet and one another. If we open our eyes and heart we will see that there has been so much to learn from this virus and how it’s changed our lives. I especially love how Apollo is exercising 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Too kind, sister, golden goddess of the Tikka Masala here xx

    Liked by 1 person

    • Pam Lazos says:

      😂🤣 Ah, it’s sooo yummy!!

      Liked by 1 person

      • it looks wonderful and I like what you said re sharing tips etc. I love to cook, prob cos I only do it certain days. I think just now it is really important to be able to say…like tomorrow night now… we are having a nice homemade whatever and some wine. Or I can bake a batch of this or that as opposed to sitting twiddling the thumbs. No pleasure in these simple things. And I have enjoyed adding to my recipe stash too lately. Tomorrow’s will be one. A nice red pepper lasagne. The curry will be back on the menu next week. Yours looks fab.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Pam Lazos says:

        Red pepper lasagna?! Do tell!!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Okay. Well you cook your lasagne sheets OBVi… whenever. For the filling you dice your red peppers and some carrot and just fry them up with chill flakes and paprika. In fact fry them what you like that way. Then when they are cool, you mix in cream cheese. Again just let the mix sit a wee minute then stir in basil, garlic and whatever amount of either passata, or tinned diced tomatoes you want, again you can subby and use some tomato soup if you want. Once you have done that you just layer it up in the dish, adding thin cheese slices between the layers. I know you can do this with any veggie here but honest I’d say the red pepper is the best. It has real body and taste. it is quite a fav of ours.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Pam Lazos says:

        OMG, Scottish lasagna is so different than Italian lasagna. I will have to try it. Also, I don’t boil my noodles first!😂😂😂

        Liked by 1 person

      • We are not big eaters of redmeat. Just now and then and when we do we use a lot of veg. Sometimes though if we were out in the pub just down the road, for a meal, I’d order their beef lasagne as it was really nice, not a dish I ever made–too scuttery–and I’d never found a decent veggie subbi–too bland. What this recipe said is that it was not unlike a meat one in that it had taste, bite and zing. And truly it is the best veg we’ve tasted.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Pam Lazos says:

        I don’t make my lasagna with meat either. Sometimes spinach or zucchini. I’m a veg at heart, married to a carnivore. We all have our crosses to bear. 😂😂😂

        Liked by 1 person

      • LOL Love it. This isn’t a Scottish recipe!. This is one from a blog follower and I can’t remember where but certainly not the UK at all. She talked about noodles but we talk sheets — prob why it sounds as if it is. Also we have sheets and they are pretty what we would call ‘teugh’ here. They need boiled they are so thick sometimes. Ah indeed the crosses eh!! Including carnivores. We used to love our steaks and all way back. But tastes change. There’s things we can’t quite give up though we seldom eat.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Pam Lazos says:

        Take a picture next time you make it and send it to me!🤓
        It’s funny how different places call things by different names. My mother grew up in a very Italian neighborhood in Philadelphia and everyone called spaghetti 🍝 sauce “gravy” which is what I still call it — gotta make my gravy — but my hubs and his family think I’m talking about brown meat gravy instead of red pasta gravy. 🤣 After almost 20 years everyone’s finally figured out what I’m talking about. 😉

        Liked by 1 person

      • THAT is so true. I mean we talk about things in Dundee and say I am off for the messages.. That is the shopping actually. My lasagne is sitting ready to go in the oven now. Seriously I used to put the pasta in way back and it aye came out like crisps. I only ever made it successfully in a Tagine cos it steamed it before now.

        Like

      • Pam Lazos says:

        I don’t know how I missed this message, Shey. Is the lasagna ready yet?! ;0)

        Like

  12. Deane H Bartlett says:

    Namaste dear friend. Those Nast girls are beautiful and talented!

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Hurrah for uplifting and positive! Beautifully done Pam, thank you xoxo

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Beautiful posts like this never fail to leave me feeling peaceful and ever hopeful, this unforeseen stillness and rest is a balm to a beleaguered planet, I’m eager to experience what’s on the other side!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Pam Lazos says:

      Many thanks for your kind words. 🙏🥰😍

      Liked by 1 person

      • My pleasure! Guess what? I found an outlet for the title I thought of that matches your “isolation diary” posts…I choose an orphan book from our laundry room shelves that tenants aren’t reading and wrap it up in newspaper, I then add a sticky note that reads, Reading In The Time Of Corona (A Blind Date Book) with a clue/blurb on what’s hiding inside. I drop it into the crook of a hollow tree where the squirrels play and hide their nuts. Our local library and Indigo Books had a Blind Date book program and I thought, a-ha! I’m on week four of doing this and loving it…

        Liked by 1 person

      • Pam Lazos says:

        That reminds me of the one week a year when you were supposed to leave a book you loved on a random park bench or on a train or something for a stranger to pick up! I love 💗 that idea.

        Liked by 1 person

  15. lampmagician says:

    Great idea, keep moving 😊🙏❤❤

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Damyanti Biswas says:

    Family is so important and we do tend to take them for granted at times. Glad that you are utilizing this time in every which way!

    Liked by 1 person

  17. You’ve said a lot of thigs eloquently in this essay. And maybe this more than anything:

    “For me, this time has shined a spotlight on the importance of family. I never took my family for granted, but watching the impermanence of life play out daily across the globe makes me realize that it’s true — we only have the present — and despite every day looking a lot like the one that came before it, every day is still special.”

    Hi Pam. Bye till next time!

    Liked by 2 people

  18. Ally Bean says:

    Well said. I like your take on what the coronavirus means to us in the moment and how it can influence us to be different/better in the future. I’ve seen this time in history being referred to as the Great Pause. I like that idea, suggesting we as a world will get on with things when the time is right.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Every day is special indeed, my friend. This is a lovely heartfelt and true post x

    Liked by 2 people

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