Home Sustainable Home — #WATWB

 

[p.s. pre-script — apologies to all you #WATWB peeps.  I must have checked the Mayan Calendar when I thought this month’s post was on the 24th!  If you want to put this aside until the 31st and come back and read it on the real #WATWB Friday, feel free to do so. ;0)]

Home Sustainable Home

Well, the kids left for college this week — first time out of the gate for the youngest so it was emotional on many levels for all parties involved, but particularly we the parents who are now without young nesters to boss around, I mean negotiate with, and while that may sound like a dream to those who relish the quiet, I think I’m more of the parenting variety who extols the virtues of quiet yet thrives amid the chaos, embracing the crap out of it.  So understandably, I’m a little at odds with the house today, and while I know I will inevitably get used to my kids being at college, I’m kind of thinking it will get a bit worse before it gets better

But, and it’s a big BUT, one thing which has improved beyond all my imaginings is the foyer with its zillions of pairs of shoes that could never seem to find their way to the shoe rack.  It went from looking like this:

to this much more sustainable and inviting version.

What an evolution in a period of 24 hours!  This may make it all worth it.

So while I sit here, waiting for my cell phone to ding — already I see my outgoing texts are not being answered with the regularity or frequency of which I’d hoped, while the incoming ones usually require some kind of effort on my part — I will leave you with this exciting little tidbit about my town, little old Lancaster, Pennsylvania (founded in 1729).  It just so happens that Lancaster is one of the first cities in the world, that’s world, to achieve the gold standard in sustainability, garnering a LEEDs Certification status for the entire city!  Oh yeah!  We rock it! We rock it!

LEEDs stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design and just the green infrastructure program alone (dedicated to keeping the stormwater out of the combined sewer system) is worth the trip.  In order to get the certification, Lancaster has committed to sustainable practices and is tracking how it deals with “water, energy, waste, transportation and “human experience” – which encompasses social factors such as education, equitability, income, and health and safety.”  Other cities recognized include Washington D.C.; Phoenix, Arizona; Arlington County, Virginia; Songdo, South Korea; Savona, Italy; and Surat, India.

As the population grows (7.6 billion and counting) and demand for resources becomes more acute, sustainability is the key to actually having a future.  It’s not as hard as it sounds — the EPA mantra of reduce, reuse, recycle will help you get started if you want to “sustainablize” your own life.  Hey, if sleepy little Lancaster can do it, so can you and your city.

We Are the World Blogfest (#WATWB) Friday continues with a whole contingent of writers and if you want to join the party go here.

Remember, keep it brief, keep it uplifting, and keep it real.

TGIF!

pjlazos 8.24.18

 

 

 

 

About Pam Lazos

writer, blogger, environmentally hopeful
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

46 Responses to Home Sustainable Home — #WATWB

  1. byliil says:

    Tidier shoerack or the space in front of it might be a consolation price 😀 It’s great to hear Leeds is working so well on green living 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

  2. That’s an amazing change in the look of your foyer :).

    And way to go, Lancaster! Singapore, where I live, is so backward on this that I’m almost ashamed. This country is a big, plastic-loving metropolis, really.

    Liked by 3 people

    • pjlazos says:

      Aw, well, when I moved here 24 years ago it didn’t give a hoot about the environment. The last decade plus we had a good mayor in office who really believed in environmental stewardship as a way to evolve and people liked the mayor so we lucked out!

      Like

  3. Eliza says:

    Thanks for sharing!

    Liked by 2 people

  4. da-AL says:

    wishing you the best — it’s always hard to feel ‘left behind’

    Liked by 2 people

  5. We have a shoe rack in the front hallway too, which just emptied out a bit when my daughter went back! She took back an entire duffel bag worth of shoes, and stuffed them with socks. And wondered, for some reason, if the TSA people would think she was smuggling something untoward in all the shoes. Seems to have not been a problem–LOL!

    Liked by 4 people

  6. the photo reminds me of when my siblings and I were young. Those were great times! We even worn each other shoes from time to time. Ha. Congrats to Lancaster PA on its award. Every state/nation should step up.

    Liked by 4 people

  7. That’s wonderful to hear about your city…and your shoes. 🙂 Blondie starts school Tuesday, and this time, she takes the bus. I have a feeling that will get me choked up, as we’ve always driven her in, but she’s old enough and likes riding with her friends. Ah, the little ones grow…

    Liked by 3 people

  8. These changes always seem to come too soon, but now you can work on your novel 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

  9. Ken Dowell says:

    So the list of CEED certified cities includes nearly 300 year old Lancaster and barely three year old Songbo, a newly created “smart” city. Was the certification dependent on your family cleaning up their shoes?

    Liked by 4 people

    • pjlazos says:

      🤔😂🤣
      Perhaps, but I think a lot of it has to do with the city’s commitment to improving their combined sewer system by taking out all the stormwater they can through green infrastructure which helps above ground and below and improves water quality. They also scored high on the other four metrics. I think that there’s a good life/work balance going on here so that also helps. I’m going to do a bit of a deeper dive and get back to you on that, Ken.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. lindasschaub says:

    The picture of the messy shoe pile versus the neat shoe pile says it all … clutter free but you’re clutching a little as you become a true empty nester. 🙂

    Liked by 5 people

  11. Susan Scott says:

    Well, the kids will fondly and proudly remember about their own city and the part you played in it and many congratulations on it obtaining the LEED certification. Nice that there’s a spot of tidiness around. Kids learn about being tidy when they have to fend for themselves (hopefully!). But it is quite a thing to adjust to ie for those that remain behind!

    I got a huge fright Pam that this is your #WATWB post … I had to double check the date of the last Friday of the month. Have a great weekend 🙂

    Liked by 4 people

  12. hilarymb says:

    Hi PJ – well congratulations on seeing the kids this far along … and as you know ‘home will be home’ to them as they continue on into adulthood. But fun to read. Excellent news re Lancaster … I’m sure you’ve mentioned the town before – but that’s really good news and I should read up more about them … still the LEEDS is in my memory bank now . Take care – half term’s not far away! Enjoy the peace and quiet … if the dog can recover, you will!! Cheers Hilary

    Liked by 5 people

  13. TanGental says:

    I’m fascinated by the LEED CERTIFICATION. I will immediately google it. Well down on your home town on taking the lead. I guess London will get there in 2078 or some such. Still the dishwater goes on the tomatoes so I suppose that’s a start.
    Ah empty nesting. Yep, make the most of it. They’ll soon be home complaining the fridge has nothing in it and shedding clothes like a snake does skin. And then they return for good and those college days seem like… actually that’s really nice too isn’t it.

    Liked by 4 people

    • pjlazos says:

      Heehee – Not ready for Post college, but it’s a process so by then I’ll have had time to get used to the whole mess, or lack thereof. I would have thought London would be more advanced given the aging sewer system that they need to deal with and for which green infrastructure is great. Probably only have time to deal with a couple problems at a time and Brexit and immigration are more important than a little fecal coliform in the river. 😩
      I still owe you interview Qs. Will get them out this week, Geoff.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. My darling…a different phase in your life–for a time anyway. Nice post xxxxxxx

    Liked by 4 people

  15. Ha, after our last conversation I am so glad you get the tidy shoe area at last – a small comfort to the empty nester, but, we take what’s on offer………. They will return to diss the foyer again 🙂
    Congrats on your little city leading the world. That’s a big plus for the place you call home. My little city is still a long way off making that goal – but still, we do what we can.

    Liked by 4 people

    • pjlazos says:

      Oh my gosh, Pauline, the shoes! The relief! It’s giving me a mind to redo the whole thing now. We’ve been in this house 16 years and the kids were hard on it. So maybe a room by room redo is in order. Wish your crafty decorator self lived near by for some tips to spruce it up. I wonder where the term “spruce it up” cane from anyway?😘

      Liked by 1 person

      • That would be so much fun – do-ups and do-overs and spruce ups are my idea of fun! You got me curious, I was thinking of spruce trees looking all trim and erect and so went onto google to see if I was correct. No! ‘Originally, things that were spruce were those items brought from Prussia; for example, spruce fir trees and, more to the point for this phrase, spruce leather. From the end of the 16th century, spruce was used as a verb meaning ‘to make trim and neat’. Who knew!! Have fun! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • pjlazos says:

        Awesome! Thanks for the linguistics lesson!👍❤️

        Like

      • pjlazos says:

        I’m thinking about your note, Pauline. What was spruce leather and how was it used?! It’s such an oxymoron, isn’t it?😘

        Like

      • Yes it is! I went on a wee search and came away much educated. Back in the mid 16th C spruce leather was the thing for your jerkins. Very popular, very stylish, very cool. Apparently called spruce leather because the bark of the spruce tree was used in the tanning process. It has a particularly acrid and bitter juice that does the required job beautifully. Possibly even used today as I found this little snippet somewhere also ‘Essence of spruce, a thick, dark-colored, bitterish, and acidulous liquid made by evaporating a decoction of the young branches of spruce. Hemlock spruce (Bot.), a graceful coniferous tree ( Tsuga Canadensis) of North America. Its timber is valuable, and the bark is largely used in tanning leather.’

        Time to give up on leather folks! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • pjlazos says:

        Wow wow wow, so the chemicals (formaldehyde and other crap and chromium) used in the tanning process are listed hazardous substances here in the U. S, and, I’d assume everywhere because, well, science. 🔬 So Pauline, correct me if I didn’t take your meaning, but we could do away with the toxics and tan leather naturally with a spruce tree decoction?! Isn’t that something?!👏 👏 👏

        Like

      • Yes, I think so too – after all the Elizabethans didn’t have access to all the crap and their wardrobes were basically woven wool and leather. It is not uncommon to find ourselves with chemicals having replaced plants in so many of our ‘modern’ amenities. I was listening to a fellow the other day who wondered out loud if in future generations our so scientifically enlightened time will be known as the ‘Age of Ignorance’ 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • pjlazos says:

        🤔🤓😂

        Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.